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president al gore talking about hurricane katrina in his 2006 academy winning documentary, an inconvenient truth. the movie for those of you who have not seen it, warns us that due to climate change, we will experience many more super storms like sandy which forecasters say was the largest hurricane in atlantic history. climate change deniers will say the weather has always been weird. here are some inconvenient truths that they may want to consider. in the 1970s, there were just an average of under eight named storms per year. named storms like the a b c. in the 198hehe ample w ju ju u uerer nine ---- the average was just under nine per year. in the 1990s, it was about 11 named storms per year. in the 2000s it jumped to nearly 15 storms a year and get this, in the first three years of this decade, 2010, 2011, 2012 the average is just under 19. specifically, we had 19 named storms in 2010. we had 18 in 2011 and so far we've had 19 named storms and there is an entire month left in hurricane season this year
expensive than the damage from katrina. we are watching this one very, very closely. just a huge storm sprawling storm at 1,000 miles. >> oh, my goodness. one to watch. thank you. >>> someone in the bay area is now a millionaire. we will tell you where the winning super lotto ticket was sold. >>> it's unbelievable. it's something i definite -- i think this time around, i appreciate it even more because i understand the difficulty of winning. >> that's right. twice in three years. the giants are once again world series champions. we will have a live report coming up. >>> in other news now, prices at pump are continuing to fall. the average cost for a gallon of gas in san jose has fallen to $4.11. this is a 24-cent drop compared to last week. last year, gas was 30 cents lower than right now. >>> today was the day that facebook employee cost finally sell their shares. back in august, the big money with early investors. today was the little guy's turn. as far as sandy, we won't know that for some time. the physical damage is one part of the cost. one-third of americans live in the storm co
airlines to talk about the impact on the industry and the man who led fema during hurricane katrina will tell us what the federal emergency agency should expect from this storm. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use, it's the ultimate combination of speed, small size, and low-cost printing. you have to dig a little. fidelity's etf market tracker shows you the big picture on how different asset classes are performing, and it lets you go in for a closer look at areas within a class or sector that may be bucking a larger trend. i'm stephen hett of fidelity investments. the etf market tracker is one more innovative reason serious investors are choosing fidelity. get 200 free trades today and explore your next investing idea. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] don't just reject convention. drown it out. introducing the all-new 2013 lexus ls f sport. an entirely new pursuit. >> we talked
to start rebuilding. up next we have an expert from katrina. >> another look at the damage and devastation after sandy. >> it is now quarter past the hour. it is now just a pile of broken concrete. peter doocy has been down there the past few days. he is in delaware to tell us a little bit about the situation the there>> >> 8.1 million people are still without power. that will be something that continues to be a problem as the days go on. right now it is cold outside. it is 43-44 degrees here in delaware on the boardwalk f. you don't have power you don't have any heat. boardwalk is a little bit sandy different stories of the boardwalk is completely splintered in some cases. folks who are familiar with the boardwalk are not going to remember it or they are not going to recognize it when they go back to visit later on. residents know they are very lucky to have avoided that kind of devastation. >> we were very fortunate. we thank god that the storm went north of us. we never expected new york was going to get anything worse. the city came through much better than anything any of us could hav
with hurricane katrina. here's live in studio with me just moments away. >>> and you know this storm is throwing a big monkey-wrench into the battle for the white house. battleground states are in hurricane sandy's path. which candidate does the storm help or hurt? what if there was a new way to deal with money that focused less on fees and more... on what matters? maybe your bank account is taking too much time and maybe it's costing too much money. introducing bluebird by american express and walmart. your alternative to checking and debit. it's loaded with features, not fees. because we think your money should stay where it belongs. with you. the value you expect. the service you deserve. it feels good to bluebird. get it at your local walmart. >>> this is your prais for breaking coverage of hurricane sandy and the election. we will be carrying this at least until 11:00 p.m. eastern tonight, possibly longer if it warrants, because this storm is forecast to be a monster when it makes landfall. don't go anywhere. a lot of people said they are holed up in hotel rooms and stuck at airports watchi
oceanic and not mr. association, the costliest storms to hit katrina by one at funk shot. take, about 30 billion. andrew in 90 to about 36.5 billion. wilma in 2005, i've been 18 billion, charlie indo for 15 billion, reader, frances and jeanne all and hurricane damage. in your view, does the national flood insurance program currently structured work? >> i think it does work. it does help protect consumers from an uninsurable event in the private arcade. the program was created in 1968 was the result created because the private market could not accurately and in suitably underrate the insurance risk. so what was happening was people were completely without flood insurance protection. so is happening in the 60s and 50s as american citizens were being flooded and the only recourse that she had was federal disaster assistance after the fact. so the program was created to have people pay into a program and be prepared for storm and a flood event before it happened. now, it certainly could use improvement. you know, there are critics out there whose fate is is too subsidized by the federal gove
fall-out from hurricane katrina sandy. be safe. if you are in the past, midwest, be careful. lock it down. ♪ ♪ >> bret: monster storm sandy leaves 40 dead. millions without power. or transportation. the two presidential campaigns in limbo. this is "special report." ♪ ♪ >> bret: good evening. i'm bret baier. this time, the hype was justified. what was billed as the biggest storm to ever hit the atlantic coast delivered a crippling blow to the northeast. the entire region nearly half the states in the country were affected in some way. new jersey governor chris christie called it "de stating."devastating." beyond anything he thought he'd see. this is as the presidential campaign begin the final week. rick leventhal is on point pleasant beach. good evening, rick. >> reporter: this storm left 8.2 million homes in the dark tonight. including more than 2 million in new jersey and this entire community of point pleasant beach. the destruction here, up and down the new jersey coastline is de stating. the recovery is only just beginning. >> the level of devastation at the jersey sh
from the corps of engineers a special team that pumps and they worked in katrina. they are onsite. we are showing them the situation and they are assessing it. we want to pump out the water to see what is going on in the tunnels and that will help us get the power back. >>reporter: the most difficult question, timetable, your best projection when new york city will return to the new york city we all remember. >>guest: is the new york city you remember. it is the new york city you remember today. because it is made up of new yorkers. >>reporter: with working subways. >>guest: well, the new york subway system...the buses have started running this evening limited and will run full service tomorrow. subways will come back in the in few days but the subways don't make new york, new york. >>reporter: i should add, some good news we are told that when the buses are up and running today and tomorrow, they are going to be free. >>shepard: a lot of questions about the power grid in lower manhattan and whether they can supply power to the stock exchange. he clearly cannot hear me. another point
the team. we led the team that won the pulitzer for -- for hurricane katrina in biloxi. hurricanes are very unpredictable. when you first have the path coming up hugging the coast, maybe turning eastward out to see, now move that pressure -- to sea, now move that pressure system that will turn it in over our heads in d.c., you know, you don't know what's going to happen. particularly with nine days out to the election, these days are crucial for the campaigns to get out on the road, hit the swing states. those states that are going to be critical in deciding the next president. so this tosses a lot up in the air. >> brian, stand by for me. we created this pictures here. we put together -- we're showing the campaign layers, if you will, impacted by the storm hitting the east coast. so you know, we're already seeing, as you mentioned, some of the campaign events across the country for romney or boom delayed or canceled. we are expecting huge travel delays in addition to impacting millions of travelers. the campaigns may have to do last-minute maneuvering. also a major storm hitting the most d
with the business of politics is impacted by weather and remember, katrina and what happened with george w. bush's reputation, it's impacted other politicians along the way. let's talk now about the actual event itself. george is a storm chaser. george, have you ever seen-- first of all, it's such a late season hurricane and it's meeting with the arctic air from canada and the low pressure system coming from the west. what's going to -- what's going to happen. first of all, what's it like where you are and what's going to happen? >> well, right now, i'm similar to the weather system from canada, i'm on myself on my way from canada. it's calm right now. getting near the pa-new jersey border getting into position to go down near the water in jersey or long island and i've never seen anything quite like this. been through about 16 hurricanes, including katrina, rita and ike and although this isn't the most powerful storm i've been in, it's certainly the largest and i'm curious to see what's going to happen because it's not often you see this type of combination of weather systems, impacting a pop l
out. so massive muchs have been brought in used in katrina to train the tunnel. kennedy airport should reopen tomorrow. laguardia is still under water. newark has no power. amtrak could have limited service. for the subways, well, engineers have to walk all 600 miles before the stations begin to slowly reopen. back to you. >> bret: big job. william, thank you. were you or someone you know stranded? let me know on twitter. follow me. @bretbaier. still ahead, if you live in ohio, the politicians will find you. first, while the u.s. still has not interrogate interrogatey suspect known to be in custody in the libya terror attack. years ago, my doctor told me to take a centrum silver multivitamin every day. i told him, sure. can't hurt, right? then i heard this news about a multivitamin study looking at long-term health benefits for men over 50. the one they used in that study... centrum silver. that's what i take. my doctor! he knows his stuff. [ male announcer ] centrum. the most recommended. most preferred. most studied. centrum, always your most complete. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ]
the florida coast. we got a lot of their grain from katrina. but all of the storms before, we were affected by many of those. we are 100 miles and the coast. you know what i am saying it? i think it is global warming. it could be other things and stuff. but the way the pollution and stuff is affecting the world -- there you can see different changes and stuff. that is what i want to say. host: this also from the wall street journal about transportation. riders took a 5 billion trips and public systems and washington, d.c., philadelphia, boston, jersey and the greater new york city area. scena. go ahead. caller: i am living in new york. and this is an economy issue. i am looking across the street and new jersey is deadlocked. i look downtown and it is blacked out. all of these people cannot go to work today. their businesses are closed. there are people scrambling. my friends are calling and asking where can i get food? this is a big issue. $20 billion is easily going to be the cost of this. it is all about the economy. we can get more than enough energy. and you wouldn't be facing climate c
how much money geico has made since the katrina year, how much buffett has made? a fortune. what was that, 2005? >> yeah. >> but i do wonder if you did have trading this morning, what somebody look travelers or berkshire would be trading at. >> but weaved had less hurricanes since 2005 than you would think. >> refinery, do you know anything about the plants around here? >> i don't know the specific plans, but i know that's certainly a risk. about 7% of the nation's refining is done here in new jersey and dwell wear. and they're right in the path. absolutely right in the path. so i would expect to see those guys shut in if they haven't already. which will impact obviously gas prices. >> there was speculation how you could see oil prices drop because no one will be taking supply. >> that's true. absolutely. >> paul, thank you very much. you'll be in-house with us. >> i'm weathering the storm here. >> andrew, i'm not kidding, last week, a sociologist writing for the huffington "post" said if this doesn't get us to completely try to get off all fossil fuels as quickly as we possibly
's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet, all that water coming on in and the high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here unfortunately. >> all right. mark mann cue sew from accuweather. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy and what the red cau cross is doing to help out. >> plus more incredible rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. en. we'll be right back. >> announcer: "america this morning" brought to you by 5 hour energy. 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. so i can get the energized feeling i need and support a great cause? i'm sold. pink lemonade 5-hour energy? yeah and a portion of every sale goes to the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. i'm sold. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy. get the alert, energized feeling you need and support breast cancer research and access to care. but what about your wrinkles? neutrogena® rapid wrinkle repair visibly reduces fine lines and wrinkles in just one week. why wait if you don't have to. neutrogena®. [ male annou
york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet. all of that water coming on and those high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here, unfortunately. >> all right. mark mancuso, from accuweather. thanks for joining us this morning, mark. >>> straight ahead, more of our continuing coverage of sandy. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy. and what the red cross is doing to help out. >>> plus, more incredible video from across the storm zone, including rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. >>> welcome back, everyone. 5 million people take the new york city subways every day. and this morning, the entire system is shut down. seven subway tunnels under the east river are flooded. and the electricity that powers -- runs the system, is turned off to contain the salt water damage. getting the trains up and running again will be a massive undertaking. >> it could be anywhere between 14 hours to 4 days, just to pump the w
're operating. this is cover of "the washington post." this is new york's katrina. obviously the death toll compared to that storm nowhere near approaching it but still 20 some odd people dead in new york alone. 2 million people without power. for those of you that live around here, we hope you're safe and your homes are okay and families are okay. if you're in other parts of the country or the world trying to trade today, there are going to be business decisions, trading decisions to be made. >> we don't know how badly the insurance is going to do. it's up to you. you may think it's bad for insurance. maybe it's good. we don't have a good ballpark of how much and more importantly, so much of the damage is flooding, which historically has been one of those things where you call the insurance company and they say did you read the fine print? we don't cover flooding. the federal government has at various times extended flood insurance and helped people. particularly when anyone remembers the fiasco where the federal government says, listen rich people, you can build beautiful houses again. th
. that's allstate's stand. are you in good hands? megyn: after katrina hit the gulf coast everybody wanted water and ice. after sandy the hot commodity is gasoline. some people driving 50 miles just to fill up the tank. >> reporter: a travel catch-22. you have roads being opened, you have gas stations in most cases that are not open. and the reason they are not open is gas stations need power to pump the fuel and across the tristate area there is very little power to go around. many have likened this to the gas crunch of the 1970s. remember the long lines? people lining up to fill up. there are 200 cars long, the lines to get gasoline in some cases to fill these things up. they are trying to get gas to run their generators because they don't have power antigen rayer toes burn between 4-5 gallons per hour. that's why people are on foot. there are also people filling up their cans to fill up their cars. >> if you drive around in circles you will run out much gas owner. sitting in line in the truck it burns 5 gals. >> reporter: the gas stations are worried about their gas supply being
. but it's brutal. this is our version of katrina. i've been touring the south shore today in my district, and the devastation is enormous. what you're showing on your screen is typical of many areas on long island. right now the county executive is meeting with fema to set up plans as to how the recovery will take place. work is coming in from all over the country to work with lipa, to restore the power, but it's going to be a tough haul. i can say that everything that can be done is being done. over the next several days, you'll see more power being restored. this could go on for another ten days to two weeks. >> are there still people missing? there are a lot of people who chose to ride this storm out. a lot of people who weren't even in areas that were supposed to be at high risk and they're still there. >> yeah. for instance, long beach, which is an island 30,000, 40,000 people on the island. many of them stayed, and i was talking to several people today. and this is just anecdotal. friends of theirs who cannot find their wife or daughters or their sons, cousins, people in homes who
or on your house some way so we know where you are. very reminiscent of what we saw in katrina. the good news is the vast majority of people who were told to evacuate did evacuate so you didn't have as many trapped people, as you might have expected, had they not done so. two people dead and one man who is still believed to be missing. savannah? >> katy tur in stonington, connecticut this morning. thank you. >> let's go to al roker on point pleasant beach along the jersey shore. al, what's the weather like there, first of all? >> it's still windy, matt, and we're getting bands of rain. let me show you something down philadelphia avenue. you see there's a lot of flooding, and folks walking through that standing water. do not do that. because you don't know what's in there. from a biohazard standpoint, from a debris standpoint, from live wires. there was a woman electrocuted in new york city walking through a puddle. do not do that. so -- but, again, we are talking about the remnants of sandy still hanging around for at least another 24 to 36 hour. as we take a look at the "today" map, in the n
the woman with her three dogs and we've seen this before, al, hurricane katrina, for example, people risked their own lives because they didn't want to leave their pets behind. >> and first responders taking that just as responsibly and as important as rescuing any human. because they're so important. they become parts of the family. >> exactly. and we don't know how many dogs and cats and other pets have been taken into shelters, but meredith was on earlier mentioning the aspca and other organizations have stepped up to help. that dog's like, thank you, sir, thank you. i don't need any bacon bits or anything. >> look at that. >> hey, we also want to remind you, tonight's rock center with brian williams will be completely devoted to the recovery from sandy. you can watch it 10:00/9:00 central right here on nbc. >> incredible lineup there. and just ahead, kathie lee and hoda, but first, your local news and weather.
but let's remember, president bush was criticized by both parties when he flew over katrina and didn't stop. so, i think today's show, melissa, would have been if president obama didn't offer to come here, we would be talking about why the president dissed new york, why he didn't offer to go there while he has the state wrapped up politically and doing this for political reasons. he offered to go. the mayor said, hey, we have a lot going on and we're busy and declined that. i think the mayor made a mistake. anytime a president offers to come visit on the ground i think you should take that. that is mayor bloomberg's choice. we disagree on what he did but i understand why he did it. melissa: thank goodness said the little part at the end because all of sudden you weren't on to disagree but i won you over before we start the argument, i don't put beyond the realm of possibility. you would have accepted it if you were in new york city? do you have a monitor near you? do you happen to see, can you put up the traffic again? did you happen to see what is going on? there it is. oh. >> this
, the west coast. >> that was one of famous of our colleagues years ago, during katrina, we were talking about how many poles had been town and she looked in to the camera and said just know it stay calm, help is on the way. and we all said no one can hear you. they don't have power. it was a very heartfelt sincere help is on the way, but the people that needed it were not in front of the tv set at the time. >> you send out a reminder e-mail is down. >> and then by the time it's back up -- >> isn't it crazy that e-mail is work something. >> you're right, verizon was working. >> coming up, we'll talk to governor markell to check out the damage in delaware. well find out how his state made it through the night. up. a short word that's a tall order. up your game. up the ante. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we ought to know. we're in the business of up. everyday delta flies a quarter of million people while investing billions improving everything from booking to baggage claim. we're raising the bar on flying and tomorrow we will up it yet again. governor of getting i
. and if you don't, there's a disaster. let's just look at what happened at hurricane katrina. >> yeah. >> let's look at what happened to hurricane katrina. you know what, though? again this is part of a bigger problem with mitt romney right now and republicans and democrats that are afraid to talk about how you really save this country and tackle the debt. instead, they talked about silly things like cutting fema, cutting big bird or saying we're going to take care of all of our problems by raising some taxes on rich people. instead of talking about saving this country for the next generation. >> and also not being honest about defense. >> and both sides not being honest about defense. >> okay. thank you. >> how's that? >> good. >> i don't define fema as quote big government. >> right. >> i define entitlement programs by their numbers that are going to cripple us as, quote, big government. >> "wall street journal," barack obama -- when the history of this administration is written, maybe someone will note the difference. here is that man who promised a transformative presidency, and it amount
after hurricane katrina. >> many others have been dispatched from illinois to share what they learned from katrina several years ago. >> reporter: how much water do we need to pump out? >> our estimates at this point in time are 300 to 400 million gallons of water. and it's growing. >> reporter: and even though there's not as much overall as there was in new orleans, he says the job in new york is much more difficult. >> it's not the amount of water that's the problem, it's where it is. >> it's where it is, yeah. >> and where it is is underground in miles and miles of subway and road tunnels. >> some of those tunnels are up to 2 miles long. and the only points into them is at each end. and that requires us to have some pumping capabilities that perhaps reach 1/2 mile to a mile long. >> another problem, the age of the tunnels. new york's subway system is over 100 years old. >> some places we could probably pump out quicker, but we don't want to collapse the tunnel. >> the next challenge, where to pump all that water. >> largely mostly sea water. right now we're working on, it'll get pu
andrew first time, con for hurricane katrina second, and then president obama used it for hurricane isaac to help the people of louisiana and mississippi prepare for isaac just a few months but this is a big deal that the president made this announcement before the hurricane arrived. >> stand by, general. i need to get to boston. he's in boston, coast guard admiral dan abel, he's standing by. because, believe it or not, some people maybe are going to ride out the storm and we want to talk about -- it's going to be a search rescue if people ride out the storm. so admiral, what's the best -- what are people -- what's the best thing people can do to keep safe so you don't have to deal with search and rescue? >> right, don. well, the first thing is folks should already have their boats secured and the waterfront secured and it's time to seek safe haven. at this point if you have got a boat in the water, it's time to lever it where it is and time to go asheer. we've worked with a couple cases this weekend with kayakers trying to enjoy the surf, even a guy on a dingy going out to his mooring bu
hurricane katrina back in new orleans seven years ago. only difference is this is spread out over a much bigger area. puts the storm in perspective. everyone just stay safe. 4 take acold & cough...s [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. honey? ...on the couch. that's a good thing, but it doesn't cover everything. only about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. so consider an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, they pick up some of what medicare doesn't pay. and save you up to thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket costs. call today to request a free decision guide to help you better understand what medicare is all about. and which aarp medicare supplement plan works best for you
perspective, there was a sturgeon that happened during hurricane katrina, not in new orleans but in south mississippi that was higher than 30 feet. the highest ever recorded. and that wiped out entire communities for a mile inland. here we are talking up to 11 feet and if it happens and the surge happens the way they have said, it will flood much of lower manhattan, it's already flooded the fdr drive along the side and it's just beginning because high tide is 45 minutes away. atlantic city's public safety director says much of that city is now under water. some pictures of road 30. one of the major roads into atlantic city. a writer for the philadelphia enquirer newspaper nearby sent us these pictures. part of the city's historic board walk is now in the sea. other parts have collapsed there. and the new jersey governor chris christie ordered all of atlantic city's casinos to shut down. he did that, it's only the fourth time officials have closed those casinos since the city legalized gambling more than three decades ago. storm chaser dennis sherrod joins us now. is he live in atlantic ci
with katrina and irene and so on, you look to see how individual governors and states and indeed, the federal level, have coped with this. from what you're seeing, what you're hearing and picking up, are you impressed with the preparation? are you concerned still? >> i mean, this is the first disaster i've gone through in new york city and i mean, just as a resident of the city, it seems pretty well run. i think there's always going to be things that happen and you just can't keep the ocean out of your city if the ocean's determined to get in. >> i think mayor bloomberg has been spot-on, actually. he's done a series of press conferences. he seems to be completely on top of the brief. he's prepared everybody. there's always going to be, i can't believe this, still idiots who are out there today jogging next to the water. why would you be so stupid? listen to what the mayors, the governors, president, everyone is telling you, get inside and be safe. >> i think curiosity is an incredibly powerful force. we can watch the news on tv but sometimes it's right down the street and it's very hard not t
resources well. i think government will perform well. this is not going to be katrina. when government performs well, they t re-emphasizes in people's minds that government does matter. >> what's your take on the early voting story? you have a new poll showing governor romney still in the lead and certainly they're tied, 47% each, cwhen you look at eary voting turnout. how much of an impact does this storm have on early voting turnout? >> well, some, but so many people have voted. look at ohio. a third of the voters have will be cast their votes. i think early voting has helped with the democratic base. i think the democratic base has gotten more and more enthusiastic, more and more fired up. you're seeing that with the long lines in places in urban centers which tend to be democratic. i think it's going to be a surprisingly good democratic turn youtd. >> all right. we'll leave it there. governor, good to have you on the program. >>> let's go back to julia boorst boorstin. we have more on the disney/lucas film deal. >> that's right, maria. walt disney is acquiring lucas films for $4.05
power has already been restored but it's brutal. this is really our version of katrina. i'm not saying any two tragedies are alike but i've been touring the south shore today in my district and massapequa, lindenhurst, what you're showing is typical of many areas on long isla island. fema the county executives are meeting with fema to set up compact plans as to how that recovery will take place. workers are coming in from all over the country to restore the power but it's a tough haul. i don't want to give anyone any false hope. everything that can be done is being done. i think over the next several days you will see more power being restored but this could go on for another ten days to two weeks. >> are there people still missing? what we saw in hoboken, new jersey, 20,000 people are still there, stuck with water beneath their apartments and their homes but there are a lot of people who chose to ride this storm out, a lot of people who weren't in areas that were supposed to be at high risk and they're still there. >> yes, for instance long beach, which is an island probably 34,000 pe
an unnerving news conference a short while ago. during which he issued a katrina-like warning to the thousand of people in the state who he estimates are -- are marooned in their homes with no way, no way of getting out tonight. he issued a stark warning. no way the government can come rescue themmen the m ethem -- ao dan harris. next up, dramatic high stakes evacuation. one of new york state's biggest hospitals, forced to move their patients -- even, during the chaos. >>> we . >>> thank you for joining us. the floodwaters of tonight's super storm are receding, but there is no doubt it has crippled new york city. officials tell abc news that new york may be without power for several days. and that the flooded subway system will be out of service until well after the power is restored. we want to take you back to the drama unfolding in the nyu hospital in manhattan where the effects of the power outage were felt acutely when backup generators failed. the hospital was forced to evacuate their patients including 20 infants from the neo natal intensive care unit. we are joined now by our new york
barbour model in mississippi after the katrina disaster. he took that disaster and used the opportunity to basically rebuild some of those communities. it takes planning. it takes courage and leadership. i, in fact i suspect you will find in both those states with the governors. bill: that is great example. thanks for bringing that to light. let's bring to what fox news was reporting late last night with regard to libya. a big turn now. now we have this letter that was september out a couple weeks before the attack in benghazi which clearly showed the presence of al qaeda training camps in the town of benghazi. there was a lot of concern about this. where are you on this story today? >> well i think there's a huge gap between what happened and what the administration's told us. only the president can fill the gap with the truth and at the end of the day i think there is it lesz son to be learned and perhaps passed onto the kids. we had seals to ran to the ambassador's aid, in running to his aid they gave their lives. we have an administration that is running from the ambassador, perhaps
people off the roofs of their homes, very reminiscent of what we saw with hurricane katrina. we have to take a short break. when we come back in just a moment, we'll continue to update you on the breaking stories we're following in the wake of this severe storm and tell you where sandy is headed next and assessing the damage left in her wake. back right after this. [ female announcer ] a classic meatloaf recipe from stouffer's starts with ground beef, unions, and peppers baked in a ketchup glaze with savory gravy and mashed russet potatoes. what makes stouffer's meatloaf best of all? that moment you enjoy it at home. stouffer's. let's fix dinner. boring. boring. [ jack ] after lauren broke up with me, i went to the citi private pass page and decided to be...not boring. that's how i met marilyn... giada... really good. yes! [ jack ] ...and alicia. ♪ this girl is on fire [ male announcer ] use any citi® card to get the benefits of private pass. more concerts. more events. more experiences. [ jack ] hey, who's boring now? [ male announcer ] get more access with a citi card. [ crowd c
with andrew which damaged his political career, it was damaged. of course george w. bush in 2005 with katrina. many people in the bush white house cite that was the low point of his presidency. a lot of dangers also, a lot of political opportunities. >> let's get practical. early voting is happening in these states. maryland cancelled early voting for the day. how much of an impact is that especially for the obama campaign is very much -- >> they are dependent on it, talking about it, counting on it. it does have an impact. it moves romney into an awkward situation. anything he does looks blatantly political or needy he's not in the equation when the country is under siege from a massive storm. >> the president of the united states went to the fema command center which by the way was it cynical or maybe the people running the campaign said we need to get him there. the president was doing what presidents do. what does mitt romney do? >> real quickly this close to the election does it matter if they got to cancel these rallies and what about their ad? if you're wall to wall coverage in these m
on a real storm that took real lives. and remember katrina? thousands of people wouldn't or couldn't heed the warning and had to be rescued. so how do we handle any creeping cynicism in the face of sandy? perhaps we take our cues from the movie. >> the storm is going to get worse. we stay inside, we keep warm, and we wait it out. >> you know, the mayor of new york city had a very powerful comment about this. he said if you live in an evacuation area and you refuse to leave, you're not only risking your own life but also the lives of first responders who may have to come and rescue you. lara, back to you. >> thanks so much, dan. >>> coming up next, surviving the storm. everything you need to keep your family safe. and what people in the path of the storm are saying right now. "good morning america" will be right back. maybe you can be there; maybe you can't. when you have migraines with fifteen or more headache days a month, you miss out on your life. you may have chronic migraine. go to mychronicmigraine.com to find a headache specialist. and don't live a maybe life. but the acidic levels
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